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Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | 2018 Amica Newport Marathon Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | 2018 Amica Newport Marathon <p>​Boys Town New England is excited to be a part of the 2018 Amica Newport Marathon on October 7! <br><br>Not only are we one of the charitable partners of the race, but we also have a team of runners fundraising just for Boys Town New England, including our new Executive Director Jon Jelley.  <a href="https://www.crowdrise.com/o/en/campaign/boys-town-new-england-team-2018" target="_blank">Donate to the team now </a>and learn more about the employees training for this race. Let's cheer them on with our donations!<br><br>Thank you for your support and we hope to see you cheering on the sidelines October 7!</p>2018-10-07T05:00:00ZEvent<img alt="Marathon" src="/locations/new-england/PublishingImages/nEngMarathon.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /> <img alt="Marathon" src="/locations/new-england/news-and-events/PublishingImages/marathon.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />New England;#

 

 

Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | A Message from Our New Executive Director Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | A Message from Our New Executive Director <p>Hello Everyone, </p><p>My name is Jon Jelley and I am the new Executive Director of Boys Town New England. </p><p>Having worked for Boys Town for almost 20 years, I feel extremely fortunate to have the opportunity to lead our mission in such a unique location. Not only does this area have wonderful scenery and a beautiful coastline, but it also has a storied history. Interestingly, although I am originally from England, my family can be traced back to the area around Barnstable, in Massachusetts.  </p><p>Like other families across the country, families in New England face tough challenges like poverty, drug addiction and crime. Since 1991, Boys Town New England has been providing life-changing care to at-risk children and families in local communities through our Treatment Family Home Program, Foster Family Services, Care Coordination Services and Common Sense Parenting classes. In 2018, Boys Town New England is on track to serve more than 1,200 children in these programs. </p><p>Boys Town also is working in some of the most impoverished neighborhoods in the area. For example, through ongoing support from the United Way, we are providing assistance and training to families of elementary school children in Pawtucket and Central Falls.</p><p>I would like to thank you all for your generous support over the years and encourage you to continue to strengthen our mission of "Changing the Way America Cares for Children and Families." </p><p>Sincerely,</p><p>D. Jon Jelley<br>Executive Director, Boys Town New England</p>2018-08-13T05:00:00ZNewsNew England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Greetings from Our New Development Director Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Greetings from Our New Development Director <p>Hello There,</p><p>I'm Amanda Baker and I'd like to introduce myself as the new Development Director here at Boys Town New England. I want to thank you all for your support of our work with the kiddos and families that turn to us for help and guidance.</p><p>I began my career with Boys Town New England about four years ago in the Development office, and accepted the Development Director position on June 1. So yes, if my name sounds familiar, you're absolutely right – you've probably received phone calls, emails and notes from me!</p><p>As a wife to an amazing husband and a mother to two little ones, I struggle with the everyday parenting of toddlers. I am fortunate to be part of a wonderful "village" of friends and family I can always count on for help and advice. For many local children and families, Boys Town New England is their "village." I am excited about leading our site's fundraising efforts and helping to grow our programs and services so we can be that "village" for many more children and families. </p><p>I look forward to working with all of you as we reach out to help others in need. Your support is greatly appreciated!</p><p>Sincerely,</p><p>Amanda Baker<br>Development Director, Boys Town New England</p>2018-08-13T05:00:00ZNew England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town New England Provides One Hundred Dinner Baskets for Families Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town New England Provides One Hundred Dinner Baskets for Families <p class="MsoNormal"></p><p>Between November 1, 2017, and November 15, 2017, Boys Town New England held their annual Buy-A-Bird Thanksgiving food drive for the families that Boys Town serves. The Buy-A-Bird food drive was a way for the community to perform an act of kindness by helping a family enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving meal.</p><p>During the course of the two weeks, money donations were gathered to purchase the Thanksgiving fixings that would fill baskets. Employees then worked together to assemble the baskets and personally deliver them to the families that are in Care Coordination, Common Sense Parenting classes, and In-Home Family Services.</p><p>"This year we raised $7,800 and made 100 Thanksgiving baskets," said Development Director, Ashley Medeiros. Each basket that was put together by employees contained: fresh vegetables, stuffing, potatoes, corn bread, and a $25 gift card to purchase meat and dairy products.</p><p>Buy-A-Bird Thanksgiving meal drive first began five years ago, when community-based families needed help around the holidays. In the past, canned goods were collected to provide families with the necessary items for a wonderful Thanksgiving meal. However, Boys Town New England wanted to give back as much as they possibly could and decided that in order to do such, they were going to start an online donation drive. Rather than giving canned items to the families, members of the community had the opportunity to give incredibly generous donations and then fresh items would be purchased, to be placed in the baskets. Buy-A-Bird's first year was a major success, raising $3,500 and the amount has increased every year since it started. </p><p>The holidays are time for making memories with our families and giving back to others, and Boys Town New England, as well as the community, made sure that many families were able to have a very special Thanksgiving.</p><div class="hidden-gal"> <a class="image-group cboxElement" href="/news/PublishingImages/BAB_1.jpg" title="Bulk food to be portioned out. "> </a> <a class="image-group cboxElement" href="/news/PublishingImages/BAB_3.jpg"> </a> </div> 2018-01-05T06:00:00ZNews<img alt="Baskets of food!" src="/news/PublishingImages/BAB_2.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />New England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town New England Celebrates the Centennial at Spirit of Youth Gala Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town New England Celebrates the Centennial at Spirit of Youth Gala <p>Every year Boys Town New England honors a person, group, or company that has gone above and beyond to help children and families, but this year the event focused on something a little different—Boys Town turning 100. </p><p>On September 29, 2017, the Boys Town New England Spirit of Youth Gala was held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel where 200 guests were in attendance to celebrate Boys Town helping children and families across the nation for 100 years. </p><p>The evening started out with a few words from Board Chair Lee Silvestre and Executive Director Bill Reardon, followed by Community Developer Marcy Shyllon who spoke about the new Community Engagement Project the site is currently working on. Attendees were also able to hear a<a href="http://www.boystown.org/locations/new-england/news-and-events/Pages/teen-overcomes-self-defeating-behaviors-to-find-sucess.aspx"> first-hand account of Boys Town's impact on the community from Yefri Acevedo</a>, a former Boys Town youth.</p><p>However, an evening of celebration did not stop there. Throughout the night, guests were able to participate in some games of chance as well as a silent auction. Guests had a variety of items to choose from to express their competitive edge such as Celtics tickets, a signed Boston Bruins jersey, and a large care package for your canine companion. The highest bid was on a two night stay in New York City and $500 gift card to spend on Broadway tickets.</p><p>With the help of incredibly generous guests and members of the community, Boys Town New England was able to reach their goal of $75,000 by the end of the night. "The money raised will help all of our programs, but more specifically will help pay for Common Sense Parenting and Community Engagement," Ashley Medeiros said.</p><p>Through generous donations and the kind-hearted spirit of community members, Boys Town can continue to serve children and families for another 100 years! </p>2017-12-14T06:00:00ZNewsNew England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Teen overcomes self-defeating behaviors to find success Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Teen overcomes self-defeating behaviors to find success <p>​As his fellow seniors at Central Falls High eagerly looked forward to graduation day and the new adventures that would follow, Yefri Acevedo was indifferent.    </p><p>School was no longer a priority, as evidenced by his abysmal attendance record and countless incompletes. Yefri's underwhelming academic performance cast serious doubt on whether he'd earn a diploma at all.    </p><p>"I procrastinated a lot and ditched my schoolwork," Yefri said. "I hung out with friends instead of staying after school and finishing my homework." </p><p>Yefri's family had always encouraged him to excel in the classroom so he would have more options in life and not struggle to make ends meet. Whenever they asked about his grades, however, Yefri made excuses or changed the subject. He didn't want to disappoint them.        </p><p>With no one to confide in, Yefri grew more stressed, his attitude soured and his prospects for graduating dimmed. That's when a school counselor introduced him to Boys Town New England Care Coordination Services, a program designed to ensure appropriate support and resources are available to children like Yefri who struggle with academic failure and poor behavioral choices. </p><p>Yefri needed an advocate and a mentor. In stepped Boys Town Care Coordination Consultant Jose Cabrera.</p><p>"When we first met, he was silent and skeptical," Jose said. "He didn't trust me and didn't think I could tell him anything he hadn't heard a thousand times before." </p><p>Earning Yefri's trust took patience. For months, the two met regularly. In the beginning, Jose mostly listened while reassuring Yefri he had no ulterior motives.   </p><p>"I straight-up said I was in his life to learn about his goals and help make those goals happen," Jose said. </p><p>In time, Yefri's confidence in, and respect for, Jose grew, and he opened up about his troubles.</p><p>"I was wasting time around people who were a bad influence on me. Plus, I was terrible at time management. Even when teachers extended their deadlines, I still didn't get the work done," Yefri admitted.      </p><p>With constant encouragement and the occasional admonishment, Jose challenged Yefri to stop his self-defeating behaviors and save his senior year. Jose held the teen accountable when he missed class or was late with an assignment. Together, they created a daily schedule and prioritized Yefri's schoolwork.    </p><p>"I told him he could accomplish absolutely anything he set his mind to, and he's smart enough to get over any obstacle," Jose said. </p><p>The more Jose pushed, the better Yefri responded. He spent hours completing past-due assignments while staying on top of his current studies and distancing himself from bad influences. He also filled out job applications with Jose's help. </p><p>Yefri's hard work was ultimately rewarded in a big way when he earned his diploma with the class of 2017. A week later, he was certified in a job training program. Now, he's a college student majoring in business administration and working full-time.  </p><p>"All Yefri needed was someone to nudge him in a better direction," Jose said. "Once he tasted success, it restored his motivation to make something of his life." </p>2017-09-14T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="Yefri Acevedo celebrated his high school graduation with Jose Cabrera, the Boys Town Care Coordination Consultant who helped" src="/news/PublishingImages/aPhotoYefriAcevedoandJoseCCS090717.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />New England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Dad Refuses to Let Past Define His Family’s Future Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Dad Refuses to Let Past Define His Family’s Future <p>Marcus was under the influence and out of control. He was an addict whose reckless behavior and bad judgment left him ill-equipped to care for himself or his family. </p><p>His poor choices culminated in a legal mess that involved drug possession and allegations of abuse toward his young sons, Marcus Jr. and Micah. Both were placed in protective custody. </p><p>If the family was ever going to be reunited, this single dad had to change his life. The best factor in his favor is that he wanted to try.</p><p>As part of his rehabilitation, Marcus was referred to Boys Town New England's Care Coordination Services (CCS) to get support and guidance on how to create a safe, stable home environment. The CCS program includes a visitation component, so parents like Marcus can get coaching and participate in skill-building activities to repair their family relationships and ensure successful reunification.</p><p>For nearly nine months, a Boys Town CCS Consultant worked with Marcus. Much of that time was spent on refining and reshaping his parenting style. According to Dad, he disciplined his kids the same way he had been disciplined. But those old-school methods were often harsh, sometimes physical and always ineffective. </p><p>To empower Marcus to become a more compassionate and capable parent, the CCS Consultant introduced him to Boys Town Common Sense Parenting<sup>®</sup> skills. </p><p>The Consultant taught Marcus how to provide positive attention, use appropriate consequences, model healthy behaviors and communicate clearly. Marcus also learned how to advocate for himself and his children so the family could be reunited.</p><p>Throughout the intervention, Marcus was honest, transparent and remorseful about his past misdeeds. He never made excuses or wallowed in self-pity. He stayed focused on improving himself and making his family whole again. </p><p>In the end, his perseverance paid off. </p><p>Marcus and the children spent a happy Christmas and New Year's together – unsupervised. The reunion was such a success, the family was permanently reunited a few weeks later. </p><p>Today, everyone is doing well. Marcus Jr. and Micah are responding to Dad's new parenting style. Both love books and school, and Micah recently made the honor roll.  </p><p>Thanks to Boys Town's help and Dad's determination to change, the family is happier, healthier and whole again. </p><p>​</p>2017-07-10T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="A Man and His Son Holding Hands" src="/news/PublishingImages/AAManandSonHoldingHands473268102.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />New England;#
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town is On a Mission Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town is On a Mission <p><em>This article is written by Derek Gomes. It was posted on <a href="http://www.newportri.com/newportdailynews/news/page_one/boys-town-is-on-a-mission/article_49d7f4da-af48-540e-aa0c-7488fac3bb8f.html">newportri.com</a> </em><em>June 6, 2017.</em></p><p> </p><p>From its humble beginning on an undeveloped piece of land off West Main Road, Boys Town New England now serves about 1,000 children and 400 families from across Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts.</p><p>In the beginning, Boys Town provided foster care to at-risk children and helped keep together faltering families. Through the years, it has expanded its menu of services, including opening five homes that accommodate up to 29 children on its Portsmouth campus and offering parenting classes.</p><p>The local chapter of Boys Town celebrated its 25th anniversary last year; the nonprofit agency that has 12 locations across the country is celebrating a century of service in 2017.</p><p>The local campus, built on 18 acres of donated land, is a safe haven for boys and girls who suffer from neglect, behavioral issues or abuse. Presently, a total of 19 children live in the five single-family homes with adults who provide them with structure and guidance, according to two long-time staff members.</p><p>The Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families and its counterpart in Massachusetts refer children and families to Boys Town.</p><p>"We believe in structured work," Development Director Ashley Medeiros said. Children "get some free time if they earn it."</p><p>The skills reinforced in the homes, such as completing chores and following directions from adults, prepare the children to return to their homes or to navigate adulthood, added Doug Vanden Hoek, senior director of program operations.</p><p>Boys Town staff stay in touch with individuals who reach adulthood and "age out" of the program, making sure they pay their rent and hold down a job, Vanden Hoek said.</p><p>The youngsters currently living at Boys Town range from about 3 years old to recent high school graduates. In addition, the agency has 40 licensed foster homes off campus.</p><p>Through the years, Boys Town has evolved and added to its services as needed, Medeiros said.</p><p>The Rev. Edward Flanagan began what became Boys Town as a refuge for homeless boys in the area of Omaha, Nebraska. The model to help at-risk youth evolved from there to foster homes and then to live-in communities like the campus in Portsmouth.</p><p>Now, Boys Town is doing more outreach work to prevent families from dissolving or children being tagged by the state system in the first place.</p><p>Many of the 62 staff members rarely step foot in the Portsmouth headquarters. They work on the road, visiting family homes and schools, where they provide outreach services.</p><p>"We don't want kids taken out of home, but we know for some kids it's inevitable," Vanden Hoek said.</p><p>Boys Town New England has an annual operating budget of about $9 million, some of which comes from donations to the chapter and assistance from the nonprofit's headquarters, Medeiros said.</p><p>Its goal always will remain the same.</p><p>"There will still be that behavioral model," Vanden Hoek said. "We're just trying to change behaviors here."</p><p>Without the safety net Boys Town provides, some children would fall through the cracks.</p><p>"There's so much need," Medeiros said. "These kids wouldn't have a home. We're able to stop that. There kids now have careers and futures."</p><p>For more information about Boys Town New England, visit <a href="http://www.boystown.org/Pages/default.aspx"><span style="text-decoration:underline;">boystown.org</span></a>.</p>2017-06-09T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="Photo copyright of Dave Hansen." src="/locations/new-england/news-and-events/PublishingImages/060817_NewEnglandBasketball.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />New England;#