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Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | BU introduces master’s degree in child, youth and family studies Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | BU introduces master’s degree in child, youth and family studies <p><em></em><a href="https://www.omaha.com/sarpy/bellevue/bu-introduces-master-s-degree-in-child-youth-and-family/article_84fe639b-0c99-5a15-b15a-1fe6000ae744.html" target="_blank"><em>This article was posted on Omaha.com on Sep 10, 2019</em></a></p><p>A new master's program will introduce students to learning about child protection and juvenile justice completely through the screens of their computers.</p><p>Bellevue University will offer a Master in Science degree in child, youth and family studies beginning in October. It will have nine eight-week classes completely online.</p><p>David Hoppe, program director for behavioral science, child protection/juvenile justice and addiction continuing education, created the program because he saw a growing need in students ready to move onto graduate school.</p><p>"I looked around and there wasn't one online child protection or juvenile justice program I could find in the nation," he said.</p><p>"[I would be] writing recommendations for people to go other places like UN-L (University of Nebraska-Lincoln), which has a master's in child protection, but I was thinking, 'I think we can do this in Bellevue.'"</p><p>Hoppe said the question of will there be enough students interested in the program came up frequently when going through the approval and planning process. Though he expected around 10 students in the first semester, Hoppe already has more than 30 interested.</p><p>"There is a need specifically for people wanting to work in child protection and juvenile justice," he said.</p><p>The program is offered to anyone with a bachelor's degree, as Hoppe said he didn't limit it to one specific undergraduate major.</p><p>One aspect Hoppe made sure to exclude is requiring students to have an internship.</p><p>"My working adults, single mothers can't take off, quit their job and do an internship," he said.</p><p>Rather than a required internship, Hoppe will have students complete a project over the course of nine months with an agency.</p><p>"It's self-paced, it's finding an agency and identifying a problem in that agency and working with that agency to help solve that problem," he said.</p><p>Kristin Murray, a graduate student in the program, decided to get her master's because it focused on many of the human services jobs she already does.</p><p>"I've never taken fully online programs before, so it'll be new to me, but at the same time, it is really convenient and I'll be able to do things on my time," she said.</p><p>"I'm looking forward to getting more into the policy and procedure part of it. I'm big into finding out what things work and don't — I like to be part of putting programs together."</p><p>Murray, who works at Boys Town Duncan Day School in Duncan, Neb., said she plans on moving back to Omaha and working with Boys Town after receiving her degree.</p><p>The papers students write will be concise and in the style human services typically write in, and there will be no tests, Hoppe said.</p><p>"It's not a memorization program — this program is application," he said. "There will be lots of case studies — if you were in this situation and you were dealing with this family, what theories could you apply to this family?</p><p>"They will have read about the theories, watch videos about the theories and will apply that information to a case study."</p><p>In the field, Hoppe said there are many different careers people can take, and different agencies they can work for, such as Boys Town.</p><p>"It's not limited in any way," he said. "[They would go to] agencies that serve children, youth and adolescents."</p><p>Hoppe said it was important to add both the child protection and juvenile justice areas, because he wanted to give people more options in case they experience burnout in their careers after graduation.</p><p>Hoppe said he looks forward to the program's start.</p><p>"I'm hopeful we can have two or three successful starts this year and then we can use those folks as testimonials to show it is a viable program," he said. "It's giving students what they expected."</p>2019-10-04T05:00:00ZNewsCentral Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Effort to canonize Boys Town founder Edward Flanagan reaches key milestone Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Effort to canonize Boys Town founder Edward Flanagan reaches key milestone <p>​The effort to have Servant of God Father Edward J. Flanagan canonized a saint took a step forward today with the presentation of the Positio to Congregation for the Causes of Saints, along with a letter of support from Archbishop George Lucas.<br><br><a href="https://www.omaha.com/news/metro/effort-to-canonize-boys-town-founder-edward-flanagan-reaches-key/article_abb43a73-7e5c-59aa-a62e-a7b67a0b4af1.html?fbclid=IwAR3a4lPKoGHPBfp9iCfbcb_biLC0dMs6kY0E3ps6Z05RTHb1myqLaIsyB0U" target="_blank">Read more in this article</a> published by the Omaha World-Herald on July 22, 2019. <br></p>2019-07-30T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="Father Edward Flanagan" src="/about/PublishingImages/flanagan.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /> <img alt="Father Edward Flanagan" src="/locations/nebraska/news-and-events/PublishingImages/canonization.jpg" width="300" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />All;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Bikers ride across state raising awareness for children's mental health Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Bikers ride across state raising awareness for children's mental health <p><em>This article is written by Shannon Heckt. </em><a href="https://www.ksnblocal4.com/content/news/Bikers-ride-across-state-raising-awareness-for-childrens-mental-health-510094701.html" target="_blank"><em>It was posted on ksnblocal4.com on May 17, 2019</em></a><em>.</em></p><p>GRAND ISLAND, Neb. (KSNB) - Motorcyclists rode across Nebraska this week to carry a message straight to the governor's desk the call for more mental health services for kids.</p><p>They call themselves the Eagle Riders and they started their ride in Scottsbluff earlier in the week.</p><p>"We know that we are doing something. We are helping educate so people can make informed decisions," Eagle Riders Stop Coordinator Holly Stevens said.</p><p>The letters they are carrying ask lawmakers to consider making mental health issues a priority when it comes to kids. Organizations like Boys Town help kids ages 10-18 who have behavioral and mental health struggles. But they aren't big enough to meet the demand.</p><p>"A lot of kids fall in the gaps of you know they might qualify for a certain level of service but they truly kind of need a higher level of service and sometimes those services are hard for kids to get," Boys town Program Director Deb Hulinsky said.</p><p>Boys Town can take in about 12 kids at a time and they serve most of the western two thirds of the state. Hulinsky said there needs to be an inpatient hospital for some of the more severe cases. But most of those kids have to go all the way to Omaha.</p><p>The Eagle Riders have been making this trip for 12 years. While they still hope for change, they are passionate about showing support for the kids.</p><p>"There is no words to describe what it is to see these kids faces when we pull in and the smiles on their faces and them just being supported," Stevens said.</p><p>They hope the law makers will help get more services available in the rural parts of the state and raise awareness of children's mental health.</p><p>Hulinsky said that mental health affects everyone in some way and that Nebraska needs a lot more services to meet the demand.</p>2019-06-18T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="EagleRiders" src="/locations/central-nebraska/news-and-events/PublishingImages/eagle+riders.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Central Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Volunteers pack "Forever Bags" for foster kids Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Volunteers pack "Forever Bags" for foster kids <p><em>This article is written by Kelsey Dickenson. </em><a href="https://www.ksnblocal4.com/content/news/Volunteers-pack-Forever-Bags-for-foster-kids-511052601.html"><em>It was posted on ksnblocal4.com on June 9, 2019</em></a><em>.</em></p><p>GRAND ISLAND, Neb. (KSNB) - Non-profits look to foster hope for kids in the court system with special bags they can take with them when they move from home to home.</p><p>About 30 volunteers sort through donated items at Peace Lutheran Church Sunday. All the items will go in large duffel bags, called "Forever Bags," full of hygiene products, toys, a blanket, pillow and clothes.</p><p>"They come into town with very little. Sometimes just the clothes off their back. Sometimes things that don't even fit. Or sometimes we get babies straight from the hospital that don't even have anything," said Fannye Placke, a foster family services consultant with Boys Town in Grand Island.</p><p>Boys Town is one of the foster care agencies in the area who will receive the "Forever Bags." </p><p>They currently support 40 kids in foster care. They'll take the bags and give them out to new kids that come through their agency.</p><p>Placke said she hopes the bags will provide comfort to the kids as they move from town to town.</p><p>"I mean you see all this stuff, and you think "$10 here or there." I can't imagine how much time and effort it took for the whole community to come together for these kids, especially kids that they'll probably never meet," Placke said.</p><p>It's all part of Heartland United Way's Day of Action event. They started collecting donations for it about a month ago, and started planning the event last year.</p><p>There's 400 kids in the court system between Hall, Hamilton, Howard and Merrick Counties.</p><p>"It's really important to find the need and do everything we can to fix it and irradiate it," said Cammie Benson, director of community engagement for Heartland United Way. "There's a need out there so we tried to do what we can to help."</p><p>Heartland United Way provided a total of 400 bags for the foster care agencies in the area.</p><p>If you're interested in helping the foster kids in Boys Town in Grand Island, you can call them at 308-381-4444.<br></p>2019-06-17T05:00:00ZNewsCentral Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town cooking up new energy with remodeled kitchen Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Boys Town cooking up new energy with remodeled kitchen <p><em>This article is written by Danielle Davis. </em><a href="https://www.ksnblocal4.com/content/news/Boys-Town-cooking-up-new-energy-with-remodeled-kitchen-506914041.html"><em>It was posted on ksnblocal4.com on March 8, 2019.</em></a><em> </em></p><p>GRAND ISLAND, Neb. (KSNB) - Boys Town in Grand Island has been serving the community for almost 30 years. They've also been working with a kitchen that is as old as the home, Friday they cut a ribbon on a new kitchen.</p><p>Experts recommend that families spend dinner time together to strengthen their bond. When you are living in a temporary home environment that sense of normalcy can become even more important.</p><p>The Boys Town newly upgraded kitchen is giving the home a new energy.</p><p>"These are kids who have been labeled bad kids, and they are not. There is no such things as a bad boy, only things like bad training, bad examples and bad thinking. They just need new skills and we are here teaching them those skills and it is really encouraging to see kids thrive as we reinforce those skills," said Megan Andrews, Boys Town Senior Director.</p><p>Tours of the house were given by the kids. </p><p>"Everything at the shelter is aimed at giving the kids a real family and give them a strong family feeling," said Founder and Volunteer, Dori Bush.</p><p>The kitchen was completely gutted and rebuilt to reflect modern times. The entire project cost about $150,000 and was done completely with community donations.</p><p>"I am really glad the community has stepped up and helps out because this is an important facility for not only Grand Island but the entire state," said Senator Dan Quick, (R) Nebraska</p><p>Although the home is temporary for kids, while they are there they have improvement programs and structure. </p><p>"A lot of our kids come from fractured homes where it is not normal to eat, cook or pray together. We try to give them that normalcy as much as we can. We really believe that every kid deserves to know what it is like to be part of a family. Our kitchen is a big piece of accomplishing that," continued Andrews.</p><p>While the kitchen was being rebuilt, businesses, organizations and individuals brought them food every day. The house can hold 18 kids at a time. </p><p>They are currently in need of:</p><p>1) Parent Child Interaction Therapy Equipment</p><p>2) Video Equipment for Doctoral Student Training</p><p>3) iPad (2)</p><p>4) Window coverings</p><p>5) Loveseats (4)</p><p>6) Chairs (4) </p><p>7) End tables (4)<br></p>2019-03-15T05:00:00ZNews<img alt="Boys Town Central NE" src="/blog/PublishingImages/Banners/btsign.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /> <img alt="Boys Town Central NE" height="329" src="/blog/PublishingImages/Banners/btsign.jpg" width="555" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Central Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Community has made Christmas special at Boys Town Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Community has made Christmas special at Boys Town <p><em>This article is written by Deborah Hulinsky. It was posted to </em><a href="https://www.theindependent.com/opinion/letters/community-has-made-christmas-special-at-boys-town/article_1c975f06-fff7-11e8-8d8b-833639ddcf3e.html" target="_blank"><em>theindependent.com</em></a><em> on December 15, 2018.</em></p><p>"It takes a whole village to raise a child" is an African proverb that is frequently used to describe how children are influenced by the many people who touch their lives. This is especially applicable to the work we do at Boys Town Central Nebraska through our many programs.</p><p>This past year, Boys Town has been blessed beyond words by the generosity of our community. We were able to raise enough money from donors across the region to completely renovate the kitchen of our shelter in Grand Island. The remodeling started on Nov. 19 and we hope to complete it the last week of December. During the construction, the community stepped up once again to provide every lunch and every dinner for the kids in our care.</p><p>Christmas is a special time for the children at our shelter and for all those we serve through our programs. The children experience what some of them describe as "the best Christmas I have ever had." This is not just about the gifts they receive; it's about the love that's behind those gifts and all of the fun activities they enjoy during the holidays. Once again, this is all possible because individuals and organizations in our community come through every year to donate many nice presents through the Giving Tree at the Conestoga Mall and different clothing drives, bring treats to our kids and spend evenings with them.</p><p>I would like to thank the "village" of Grand Island and surrounding communities for all of their contributions in helping to raise the children we serve. I am proud to live in such a caring and giving community that wraps its arms around those in need, both during the holidays and throughout the year.</p><p>Have a Merry Christmas and blessed new year!</p>2018-12-17T06:00:00ZNewsCentral Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent
Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Grand Island unveils new Community Schools program Boys Town: Saving Children, Healing Families, Parenting Tips | Grand Island unveils new Community Schools program <p><em>This article is written by Alex Whitney. It was posted on </em><a href="https://nebraska.tv/news/local/grand-island-unveils-new-community-schools-program"><em>nebraska.tv</em></a><em>.</em></p><p>Bridging the gap between services and education, Grand Island Public Schools unveiled its new community schools program at Lincoln Elementary school today making them the first school in the city designated as a community campus.</p><p>But what does that mean to be a community campus?</p><p>It means that educators at Lincoln Elementary will be able to partner with community organizations like the Heartland United Way and Boys Town to provide services to their students that they typically wouldn't get directly from the school.</p><p>Dental services, access to social workers, and a variety of other programs are planned to give parents a central resource for everything they need to make their students successful.</p><p>"A lot of times we find its more convenient for families to be involved and engaged with their students when they are in their neighborhood school. So I think the key word in community schools is unity. How do we garner a number of different organizations to come together to provide additional supports our students and families desire," said GIPS Superintendent Tawana Grover.</p><p>While students come first, the new community school campus will work as a resource for families as well and part of the program is developing school campuses that parents, like Angie Martinez whose son attends Lincoln, can feel just as comfortable there as their students.</p><p>"You just go through the door and everyone says hello to you so its very comfortable. And you know all the moms that are here are friends because we see each other all the day so it feels like home you just enter and can say hello everybody," said Martinez. </p><p>The idea of community focused education isn't new for Lincoln Elementary school.</p><p>Lincoln principal Maureen Oman has always had a focus on bringing community resources into school for her students.</p><p>"We really wanted to partner with the community because they wrap their arms around us and they help us. One of the other things is we have a lot of people in our actual community who want to do things. And I just had some unique connections we started with the GI Free Church and they said can we do something for you? So those partnerships naturally aligned and that was the big push," said Lincoln Elementary principal Maureen Oman.</p><p>Friday's announcement is just the beginning of the Community Schools program in Grand Island, and the district hopes to expand the programs available and grow the number of schools so every quadrant of Grand Island has a community school nearby.<br></p>2018-12-17T06:00:00ZNews<img alt="Grande Island School" src="/locations/north-florida/Banners/GrandIslandschools.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />Central Nebraska;#text/html; charset=utf-8 NewsEvent