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Struggling in School

Helping Your Child Do Better in School

November 2nd, 2017     By Boys Town Contributor

Bully, Early Childhood, Education, Homework, Kids and Teens in Crisis

​​One of the most common issues parents ask us about at Boys Town is how they can help and support their child when he or she is struggling academically. While possible ways to address this problem depend upon the situation and the child's age, there are several general things parents can do to get their child back on track in the classroom. ​

Stay Involved

In order to address a​ny problem your child is facing, you must communicate and stay involved with your child's school beyond the regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences. Here are some suggestions for how you can do this:

  • Talk to your child often about how things are going at school.
  • If your child is older, have them keep a log of class assignments.
  • Identify and introduce yourself to important school personnel.
  • Project an attitude of cooperation with school professionals.
  • Make a plan to work with school staff if your child is having academic or behavior problems.

Contribute to a Positive Environment at School by Supporting Teachers

Letting you child's teachers and school staff members know you appreciate them can help reduce absenteeism and turnover, create a more positive school culture and encourage teamwork. Feel free to praise them via social media, too, using the hashtag #MyTeacherRocks.

Start a Routine and Make Sure Your Child Follows It

Establishing an after-school routine for your child is another way you can help them perform better academically. This includes designating a homework time in an area that is free of distractions, establishing rules for earning free time to watch TV or use electronic devices after homework is completed, and setting a specific bedtime. Not only can these things help children "get in the groove" when it comes to homework, but they also are useful when children are transitioning from long breaks, such as after the winter holidays or summer vacation.​

As with virtually all aspects of parenting, the most important thing you can do is communicate clearly with your child and establish specific expectations, goals and boundaries. Sit down with your child at the beginning of the school year and explain how you expect them to perform. Then talk with them daily throughout the school year to see how things are going, to discuss how things might be improved and to tackle problems together.

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