Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

News From Boys Town Central Nebraska​​

Untitled 1
  
  
SiteLocation
  
Page Image
  
Page Content
united-states-mint-unveils-designs-for-boys-town-centennial-commemorative-coinsUnited States Mint Unveils Designs for Boys Town Centennial Commemorative CoinsCalifornia, Central Nebraska
Wednesday, Aug 24, 2016

​​​This press release was published on usmint.gov August 23, 2016.

Designs for coins commemorating the 100th anniversary of the founding of Boys Town were unveiled today during a ceremony at Boys Town Music Hall in Boys Town, Neb.

"Each time a person looks at any one of these unique designs, it will spark an interest in learning about the history of Boys Town, acknowledging the extraordinary efforts made by this ​organization to give comfort and purpose to children in need, and recognizing the significant contributions of Father Flanagan," said United States Mint Principal Deputy Director Rhett Jeppson.

Jeppson was joined by Boys Town​ representatives Cordell Cade and Kymani Bell, mayor and vice mayor, respectively; Dan Daly, Executive Vice President, Director of Youth Care; and Jerry Davis, Vice President of Advocacy.

Public Law 114-30 authorizes the Mint to mint and issue no more than 50,000 $5 gold, 350,000 $1 silver, and 300,000 half dollar clad coins with designs emblematic of the centennial of Boys Town. 

The gold coin obverse (heads) features a portrait of Father Flanagan.  Inscriptions include "BOYS TOWN CENTENNIAL," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "FR. EDWARD FLANAGAN," "LIBERTY," and "2017."  The obverse was designed by United States Mint Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) Designer Donna Weaver and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart.

The gold coin reverse (tails) features an outstretched hand holding a young oak tree growing from an acorn.  As ​stated in the idiom "Mighty oaks from little acorns grow," this design represents the potential of each child helped by Boys Town to grow into a productive, complete adult.  Inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "THE WORK WILL CONTINUE," "FIVE DOLLARS," and "E PLURIBUS UNUM."  The reverse was also designed by Weaver and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Jim Licaretz.

The silver $1 coin obverse features a young girl sitting alone and gazing upward into the branches of an oak tree looking for help.  The empty space around the girl is deliberate and meant to show the child's sense of loneliness, isolation, and helplessness.  Inscriptions include "BOYS TOWN," "When you help a child today...," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "LIBERTY," and "1917-2017."

The obverse was designed by AIP Designer Emily Damstra and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Joseph Menna. 

The coin's reverse features an oak tree offering shelter and a sense of belonging to the family holding hands below it, which includes the girl from the obverse.  Inscriptions include "...you write the history of tomorrow," "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "ONE DOLLAR," and "E PLURIBUS UNUM."  The reverse was also designed by Damstra and sculpted by Menna.

The clad half dollar obverse features an older brother holding the hand of his younger brother in 1917.  They walk toward Father Flanagan's Boys Home and the 1940s pylon representing what would become Boys Town.  Inscriptions include "BOYS TOWN," "1917," "2017," "IN GOD WE TRUST," "LIBERTY," and "Saving Children."  The obverse was designed by AIP Designer Chris Costello and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Renata Gordon.

The coin's reverse features a present-day Boys Town neighborhood of homes where children are schooled and nurtured by caring families.  Out of these homes come young adults who graduate from high school and the Boys Town program.  Inscriptions include "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA," "E PLURIBUS UNUM," "Healing Families," and "HALF DOLLAR."  The reverse was also designed by Costello and sculpted by Mint Sculptor-Engraver Phebe Hemphill.

Pricing for the Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coins will include surcharges-$35 for each $5 gold coin, $10 for each $1 silver coin, and $5 for each half dollar clad coin-which are authorized to be paid to Boys Town to carry out its cause of caring for and assisting children and families in underserved communities across America.

The Mint will announce the release date and additional pricing information for the Boys Town Centennial Commemorative Coins prior to their release in 2017.

 
boys-town-hires-andrews-as-director-in-grand-islandBoys Town Hires Andrews as Director in Grand IslandCentral Nebraska
Sunday, Aug 21, 2016

​​This article was published August 20, 2016 on kearneyhub.com.

Boys Town Grand Island has hired Megan Andrews as the new director of central Nebraska operations.

As director, Andrews will oversee programs and offices in Kearney, Columbus, Grand Island, Duncan, and North Platte. She takes over for Dave Reed who has accepted a new position at the Boys Town headquarters.

Andrews brings a variety of program experience, a passion for helping children and families, a strong commitment to developing staff, and ensuring ​Boys Town provides quality programs and services.

Andrews holds a Master of Science degree in youth and family services from Bellevue University. She began her career with Boys Town as a Youth Care Worker in Grand Island in 2007 and was promoted to intervention and assessment services supervisor in 2009. In 2013, she launched the In-Home Family Services program. Under her direction, the program grew from two staff to 15 staff with offices across central Nebraska.

boys-town-welcomes-new-director-of-central-nebraska-operationsBoys Town Welcomes New Director of Central Nebraska OperationsCentral Nebraska
Outgoing Director of Central Nebraska Operations Dave Reed (right) stands next to his successor, Megan Andrews.
Friday, Aug 12, 2016

​​​This article is written by Robert Pore. It was posted August 11, 2016 on theindependent.com.

An open house took place on Thursday at Boys Town Grand Island to welcome the new director of Central Nebraska operations, Megan Andrews.

Andrews holds a master of science in youth and family services from Bellevue University. She began her career with Boys Town as a youth care worker in Grand Island in 2007 and was promoted to Intervention and Assessment Services Supervisor in 2009.

“I am eager to continue to help Central Nebraska families and children gain access to our important programs and fulfill this need in our community,” Andrews said.

Andrews launched the In-Home Family Services program in 2013. Under her direction, it grew from two staff members to 15 with offices across Central Nebraska.

As director of Central Nebraska operations, Andrews will oversee programs and offices in Grand Island, Kearney, Columbus, Duncan and North Platte. She takes over from Dave Reed, who held the position for nearly 20 years and will now serve as Senior Director for Family Services for Nebraska/Iowa.

“This promotion will allow me the opportunity to help Boys Town take care of more children and families over a wider area,” Reed said.

Reed said he will still work in the Central Nebraska area.

“What I will remember the most is that there is always something new going on here every day, so you never know what is going to happen here,” he said. “We had a lot of successes here and have been able to help a lot of children and families.”

When he started at the Boys Town facility in Grand Island, it provided mostly residential care. Now, Reed said, more than 75 percent of the children are served in their home or the community.

Last year, they served 821 children in Central Nebraska, Reed said.

Andrews said becoming the new director of Central Nebraska operations is an exciting opportunity.

“We want to be able to serve more youth and families here in Central Nebraska,” Andrews said. “We want to continue our efforts to keep kids in their homes and keep them safe and help them succeed.”

Andrews said Boys Town needs more foster parents.

For more information about becoming Boys Town foster parents, contact Shawna Hammond at (308) 381-4444 or shawna.hammond@boystown.org.

local-student-finds-future-at-alternative-schoolLocal Student Finds Future at Alternative SchoolCentral Nebraska
Elizabeth Anna Valla, Columbus Telegram
Monday, May 9, 2016

This ​story is written by Elizabeth Anna Valla of the Columbus Telegram . It was posted May 4, 2016 on columbustelegram.com.

Yesenia Encarnacion sees a positive future for herself, but that wasn't always the case.

Being the third youngest of six siblings, it’s always been in the back of her mind that while some of her brothers and sisters graduated from high school, some didn't.

The biggest demon she began to fight was not knowing which category she was going to fall under.

Things weren't looking good for a while.

“I didn’t like being at school and I didn’t like (where I was),” Encarnacion said. “It was annoying more than anything.”

After getting into a fight at Lakeview High School halfway through the 2014 school year, she was taken to the office where district officials found a knife in her backpack.

With the school’s zero-tolerance policy on weapons, she was immediately expelled.

“I knew I wasn’t going to last there,” said Encarnacion, who had already transferred from Schuyler Central High School.

If she wanted to finish school, her next option was Youth for Christ’s alternative education program, Out of School Suspicion, which is offered to students for a variety of reasons.

But once again, her attitude landed her in hot water when she refused to do her “boring” schoolwork.

Susan Uhl, director of the Boys Town Day School in Duncan, remembers the day Encarnacion showed up at the school.

“I was like, ‘Oh heavens, I don’t know about this girl,’” Uhl said.

She knew Encarnacion's attitude was going to cause issues.

This was either going to be Encarnacion’s third strike or her saving grace. It was up to her.

Her biggest pet peeve was having to interact with other girls, so this school was perfect with the male-to-female ratio being five to one. And another plus, Encarnacion was the only girl in her grade. She was getting exactly what she wanted — left alone.

Uhl said Encarnacion has done a 180 since she arrived at the Day School.

“She’s made the most progress out of any of our students,” Uhl said. “She’s much more pleasant to be around, much more personable and willing to step out of her comfort zone and socialize.”

Now Encarnacion can look back and laugh at how dumb her past self was acting, but she also wants others to know it’s all about keeping your mind set on your goal.

“Agree to disagree,” she said, advising others to just keep their mouths shut. “It’s just easier for everyone that way.”

Uhl credits the Duncan school's courses for keeping students like Encarnacion engaged and motivated.

“We sit them down, say, ‘Finish this, this and this and you can be done,'" Uhl said. “That was a pretty big deal to (Encarnacion).”

Encarnacion said she likes the way the school doesn’t drag out classes and makes it clear what needs to be done. This allows her to schedule around a job at Wal-Mart.

When Encarnacion found out how many credit hours she needed to graduate, she hit the books right away, bound to be one of the siblings who graduates.

“There was a time when I thought I’d never finish school,” Encarnacion said.

With only a couple of weeks left in the school year, Encarnacion is counting down the days until she reaches her goal — graduation.

After graduation on May 15, Encarnacion plans to join the Army, something Uhl says fits perfectly with her new attitude and personality.

single-woman-adopts-three-foster-brothers-to-give-them-stabilitySingle woman adopts three foster brothers to give them stability Central Nebraska
Lindsie Lybarger considers herself blessed to be a single mom to three boys — Chance, left, Xavier, and Sean, right..
Tuesday, Jan 19, 2016

This ​article is written by Kim Schmidt of the Kearney Hub . It was published December 24, 2015 on kearneyhub.com.

Some people may think Lindsie Lybarger is a little crazy.

This fall, the single, 31-year-old Kearney woman adopted three biological brothers ages 6, 7 and 8.

She prefers to call herself blessed.

“To me it was a no-brainer,” she said of adopting the boys. “I was more than willing to take them in. God did me a favor giving me them.”

Lybarger met Sean, now 8, and Xavier, now 7, in February 2012 when they were students in her preschool class. The boys, including their youngest brother, Chance, now 6, needed a foster family.

Lybarger wasn’t a licensed foster parent, but she quickly got approval and took the boys in temporarily. At the time, Lybarger was finishing her bachelor’s degree, working full time during the day, taking care of the boys, and, after they went to bed, finishing her own homework.

To complicate things more, in September 2014, Lybarger was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Medication regulates her disease, and family and friends help her to manage the boys’ schedules.

In May, Lybarger was recognized by the state Department of Health and Human Services as the 2015 foster parent of the year for the Central Service Area. Three years after becoming their foster parent, Lybarger adopted the boys on Sept. 11 in a Buffalo County Courtroom.

Once the adoption was final, the boys legally took Lybarger’s last name. They bounce between calling her “Lindsie” and “mom.”

“All I’ve known is being a single parent, and going from no kids to three kids,” she said with a chuckle. “When it’s all you know, you just do it. We’ve figured out a routine and a schedule and what works for us, and it just kind of flows.”

Lybarger is a true example of someone who put the boys above herself, said Nichole Hersh, a supervisor for the state Department of Health and Human Services foster care system. Hersh said Lybarger was open to and encouraged the boys to have a relationship with their biological family.

“For her to be willing to really involve the parents through this whole process was very important for the kids and their well-being. She was willing to take in children that she was not related to and, technically, had no obligation to them, and did a wonderful job caring for them and really putting them first.

“She could’ve easily said no,” Hersh said.

After the formal adoption hearing, the Lybargers celebrated with family and friends at a party where each boy wore a Superman T-shirt that read, “Superman was adopted, too.”

“I think it was a relief for them, because they had a home, and it was stability for them,” Lybarger said. “They were really excited.”

Anyone interested in becoming a foster parent may call 800-7-parent (800-772-7368).

thanksgiving-luncheon-lets-youth-progress-take-the-spotlightThanksgiving Luncheon Lets Youth Progress Take the SpotlightCentral Nebraska
Wednesday, Dec 23, 2015

Thanksgiving can​ be hectic. With all the preparations involved, it can be hard to give kids the attention they deserve. At Boys Town Day School in Duncan, Nebraska, however, they’ve made Thanksgiving a time when kids are the center of attention.

Each year, the school hosts a Thanksgiving Luncheon, where students – and the progress they’ve made through the year – are the stars of the show.

This year, the lunch was held on Tuesday, the 24th and marked the fifth successful iteration of the event. Started as a way of bringing teachers, families, and students together, the lunch allows everyone a chance to connect in a more relaxed environment than during other social events.

The youth also love showing off how far they’ve come. “For many of our students and families, school has not been a positive experience in the past” says Susan Uhl, the school’s Director. The afternoon gathering lets them show that they can excel when given the proper care and attention.

The school provides the meal which, at about 100 attendees and growing, is quite an offering. Students serve as the hosts of the event, decorating tables, greeting guests as they arrive, and giving tours of the school. The middle schoolers even created a ‘thankful tree’ for the luncheon, displaying colorful leaves with expressions of gratitude written on them.

Also present at the event are some members of the student’s “home school”, or the school they attended before coming to work with Boys Town. Ideally, these teachers remain aware of the youth’s challenges and accomplishments while at the Boys Town Day School, so that if and when they return, they can continue being engaged in the youth’s progress.

Parents also love to talk about how the Boys Town Model has impacted youth behavior. Thanksgiving is all about gratitude, after all, and Uhl says that “families have been very thankful for our program and our staff, sharing how much better their student is doing and how it has a positive effect on their home lives as well.”

Boys Town wishes to express gratitude to the entire team at the Day School in Duncan for all of their hard work, as well as the community which has helped to make this year’s celebration another heart-warming success!

know-a-teen-dealing-with-depressionKnow a Teen Dealing with Depression?Central Nebraska
Tuesday, Dec 1, 2015

Boys Town is offering a "Coping with Depression Group for Teens" for high school students to help develop their ability to overcome depression. The group meets on Thursdays from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Boys Town Behavioral Health Clinic in Grand Island (2313 N Webb Rd).

What is Coping with Depression?
Coping with Depression consists of three areas of focus:

  • Emotional Regulation (monitoring mood & activity, tension reduction, learning how to engage in positive change)
  • Changing Your Thinking (learning the power of positive thinking & how to dispute irrational thoughts)
  • Communication & Problem Solving (engaging in assertive, effective, & healthy communication)

Wondering if the group is right for your child? The Coping with Depression Group is designed for teens in high school struggling with depression (i.e., sadness, anger,
hopelessness, irritability, social withdrawal, loss of interest in activities, changes in eating or sleeping habits, etc. ) and having difficulties in relationships, school, and/or at home.

If you are interested in the program, an intake appointment will be scheduled (and billed to insurance) to determine if the program is appropriate. To register, call the Behavioral Health Clinic of Grand Island at 308-381-8851 and reference the Coping with Depression Group.

boys-town-receives-5000-grant-from-principal-financial-groupBoys Town Receives $5,000 Grant from Principal Financial GroupCentral Nebraska
Friday, Sep 18, 2015

Boys Town Grand Island recently received a $5,000 grant from Principal Financial Group to fund Common Sense Parenting® classes, benefiting local families in the Grand Island community.

“The support of Principal Financial Group will allow us to offer parenting classes to more families in the Grand Island community,” said Dave Reed, Boys Town Director Central Nebraska Operations. “Common Sense Parenting is a valuable resource for many families in the area.”

The CSP classes are available to any family in the community, and will be offered at the Grand Island YWCA, with the facility providing free childcare for attendees.

Thanks again to Principal Financial Group for providing the resources for Boys Town to help more families in the Grand Island community.

boys-town-celebrates-1-year-in-north-platteBoys Town Celebrates 1 Year In North PlatteCentral Nebraska
Monday, Aug 3, 2015

This article is written by Adam Uhnerik of  10/11 News . It was posted July 31, 2015.

A group in North Platte is helping parents with troubled teenagers. Boys Town is seeing a growing need for their services in North Platte.

During a lunch on Thursday the conversation centered around how Boys Town helps troubled families and kids by offering a different type of service.

"It's a preventative service because we are preventing the kids from having to be removed from their home and for example go to a group home or be placed into another home," said Dave Reed with Boys Town.

They do that by visiting families and kids right in their home.

"It can be defiance in the home and really not having the skills to work with a teen. Sometimes it can be other skills or resources they need that they are not sure how to access," said Reed.

In turn they give families tools, skills, and resources they need to help them get through tough times.

"Especially the single parents and divorced parents they need a little bit of guidance maybe some parenting skills or just brushing up on banking items and stuff like that," said Terry Scott with Guardians of the Children.

Scott works with kids through the group guardian of the children he says groups like boys town are really needed in our area.

"There is a lot of drug abuse and alcohol abuse with our youth," said Scott.

Scott says he likes how boys town works with families in their own home.

Helping kids and families lead a better life.

dave-reed-receives-for-the-love-of-children-awardDave Reed Receives For the Love of Children AwardCentral Nebraska
Monday, Jun 8, 2015

On May 7, ​Boys Town Director of Central Nebraska Operations, Dave Reed, was one of three recipients of the For the Love of Children award for his accomplishments in successfully expanding Boys Town Services in Central Nebraska.

The inaugural For the Love of Children Award Ceremony was held at the Riverside Golf Club in Grand Island, Nebraska. A committee of non-profit organizations, board members and volunteers in Grand Island held this event to recognize those in the community who have affected children in a positive way through their efforts.

During the ceremony an excerpt from the nomination letter was read, “Dave is a quiet servant for children.  He does not focus on what he has accomplished, but what he needs to accomplish and for whom he is accomplishing it. In short, he gets the job done.”

Former State Senator and current Executive Director of the Nebraska Association of Behavioral Health Organizations, Annette Dubas, was the keynote speaker.  She spoke of Nebraska children in poverty, uninsured, mental health needs and the hope that child welfare is turning the corner to address those needs.

 

new-employees-allow-boys-town-central-nebraska-to-expand-servicesNew Employees Allow Boys Town Central Nebraska to Expand ServicesCentral Nebraska
Friday, Jan 9, 2015

Boys Town Central Nebraska In-Home Family Services (IHFS) is excited for their expansion of services and employees.  The North Platte office opened in July 2014 with one IHFS Supervisor and one Family Consultant and added an additional Family Consultant in November. The Columbus office has doubled in size with two new Family Consultants since opening in December of 2013.

New services will aid in serving more children in their homes and communities before problems become so severe that they need to be placed out of their home. “Providing this early intervention is empowering because families will be able to have the tools they need to learn new skills, solve problems, and access local resources to meet their needs,” said Dave Reed, Director, Boys Town Central Nebraska Operations.

“The youth are able to remain in their own home and school while the family is able to stay together and work on needed changes,” added Reed “This is important to Boys Town because we are able to grow the community-based end of our continuum of care. Doing this is far more efficient financially while also being better for families and this translates into more resources available to serve more children and families.”

april-is-child-abuse-awareness-monthApril is Child Abuse Awareness MonthCentral Nebraska
Image is from https://www.childwelfare.gov/preventing/preventionmonth/
Monday, Mar 31, 2014

Every day, ​more than five children die as a result of child abuse. Many of these children are under the age of four.

Child  abuse occurs at every socioeconomic level, across ethnic and cultural lines, within all religions and at all levels of education. That's why it's important we all work together to raise awareness of child abuse and what to watch for if it's suspected.

Some things to look for are:

  • Unkempt, unclean appearance
  • Acting out in school
  • Lying
  • Bodily injuries in unusual areas, like the back, face or legs
  • Child is vague about their injuries, or the injury appears suspicious

When a child tells you they are being abused or neglected, what should you do? First, listen to the child - don’t lead or pressure them into talking. Use children’s vocabulary, and reassure them that they are doing the right thing. Don’t promise not to tell others and report the case immediately. 

For tips and more information about how you can help prevent child abuse and neglect, visit www.childwelfare.gov/preventing/preventionmonth/ You can also call or email the Boys Town National Hotline at 1-800-448-3000 or hotline@boystown.org.

Together we can make a difference in the life of a child.

 

 

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

90% of your donation goes to save children Donate Now